Government

Ethiopia is a multi-party federal democracy with legislative authority resting with the government headed by an executive prime minister and the elected House of Representatives (547 members) and the House of Federation (110 members). The Prime Minister is chosen by the party in power following multi-party democratic national and federal state elections which are held every five years. Parties can be registered at either the national or the federal state level. The President is elected by the members of the House of People's Representatives.

President:Dr. Mulatu Teshome

Prime Minister:Dr. Abiy Ahmed

Speaker of the House of People's Representatives:Muferiat Kamil

Cabinet (October  2016):   

  1. Deputy Prime Minister Demeke Mekonnen
  2. Dr Workneh Gebeyehu – Minister of Foreign Affairs
  3. Motuma Mekasa – Minister of Defense
  4. Dr. Amir Aman - Minister of Health
  5. Uba Mohammed –Minister of Communication and Information Technology
  6. Kebede Chane- Minister of Federal Affairs and Pastoral Area Development
  7. Dr Abreham Tekeste- Minister of Finance and Economic Cooperation
  8. Siraj Fegessa- Minister of Transport
  9. Dr. Tilaye Gete – Minister of Education 
  10. Ato Melaku Alebel - Minister of Trade
  11. Dr  Ambachew Mekonnen –Minister of Industry
  12. Ato Shiferaw Shigute, Minister of Agriculture & Livestock Resources
  13. Tagese Chafo- Minister of Public Service and Human Resource Development
  14. Ato Janterar Abay - Minister of Urban Development and Housing
  15. Engineer Aisha Mohammed- Minister of Construction
  16. Ato Meles Alemu - Minister of Mines Petroleum and Natural Resources
  17. Dr. Engineer Sileshi Bekele- Minister of Water, Irrigation and Electricity
  18. Dr Gemedo Dale- Minister of Environmental, Forest and Climate Change
  19. Dr Engineer Getahun Mekuria- Minister of Science and Technology
  20. Amb. Teshome Toga- Minister of Public Enterprise
  21. Dr   Hirut Woldemariam - Minister of Labor and Social Affairs
  22. W/ro Yealem Tsegaye- Minister of Women's and Children's Affairs
  23. Ristu Yirdaw- Minister of Youth and Sports
  24. W/ro Fozia Amin - Minister of Culture and Tourism
  25. Ato Berhanu Tsegaye - Attorney General
  26. Ahmed Shide - Minister of Government Communication Affairs Office
  27. Omar Hussein- Minister of Ethiopian Revenues and Costumes Authority 
  28. Dr Yinager Dese- Commissioner of National Planning Commission
  29. Asmelash Woldesilasie – Chief Government Whip

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New Constitution

The New Constitution

Under the new constitution, thee elections for Ethiopia's first popularly-chosen national parliament and regional legislatures were held in May 1995. Most opposition parties chose to boycott these elections as they did in 2000, in both cases giving the EPRDF a landslide victory. Opposition parties as a whole did finally participate in the 2005 election and the election produced a record number of voters, with 90% of the electorate turning out to cast their vote. The African Union report on the process commended the election for a "display of genuine commitment to democratic ideals ; the US Carter Center concluded that the majority of

the constituency results were credible and reflected competitive conditions; the US Department of State said the elections stood out as a milestone in creating a new, more competitive multi-party political system. The EU Observer Mission, however, uncritically accepting some opposition claims, suggested the election had fallen short of international standards, though it actually classified nearly ninety percent of the polling processes as good or very good. The final results showed opposition parties had increased their seats in Parliament from 12 to an impressive 176, and that they had won all but one of the seats for the Addis Ababa City Council. Despite this, the main opposition coalition refused to accept the results, claiming against all the evidence that it had won. It called for a boycott of parliament, and organized a series of street protests in Addis Ababa at the beginning of November. These rapidly turned violent, and nearly 200 people including 7 policemen died in three days of rioting. A subsequent judicial commission of enquiry deplored the deaths but cleared the police of using unnecessary force. Thousands of people were temporarily detained. A number of opposition political leaders were convicted of various offences and jailed, but pardoned two years later.

Before the next election, in 2010, most of the parties, determined to avoid another outbreak of violence, signed an Election Code of Conduct. The exception was the largest opposition coalition, the Forum for Democratic Dialogue (MEDREK), a coalition of eight parties which included most of the groups that boycotted Parliament in 2005. When it came to the vote, the electorate proved unimpressed by the opposition refusal to take up its seats in 2005, and equally disenchanted by MEDREK's failure to sign the Code of Conduct, by the opposition's lack of alternative policies, its failure to do more than criticize the EPRDF and the public bickering and quarrelling among its leaders prior to 2010. In sharp contrast, after 2005 the EPRDF had revitalized its structures, building up extensive Women's and Youth organizations and reorganizing itself through the country. It won an overwhelming majority in local elections in 2008 and used this as a springboard for the national and federal elections in 2010. By then it also had the added advantage of presiding over significant growth and development, in infrastructure, primary education and health, and of achieving double-digit growth for the whole period between 2005 and 2010. It was hardly surprising that the results were a landslide victory for the EPRDF, including a total reversal of the Addis Ababa results of 2005 - in 2010 it was the opposition which only won a single seat, although over 40% of the city did vote for opposition parties.


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